Food Perspective

19 May

Response to Carlos’ question:
How did you deal with the problems you had while on your volunteer placement?

Isn’t it funny how our short time, comparatively, in our countries have changed the way that we live our lives. Or at least for a while it did. I saw confronting and unforgettable poverty in Peru and I vowed that I would change my materialistic ways and for a while I was doing good. I would indignantly get angry when I saw superfluous expenditure. I would judge people when they would overindulge in their meals, while comparing them to the kids in Quilla Huata who barely had a thing to eat. I know it was not fair for me to impose a standard of living because food and money is more accessible to us in the Western world. Even as I write this, I am eating blueberry pancakes with honey accompanied by orange juice and peppermint tea. Though not super fancy, it still kind of is compared to what some of the kids in Quilla Huata normally get.

The transition from my world to theirs and vice versa was undoubtedly the most challenging thing that I faced. It was culture shock but not in the sense that the Peruvian culture is vastly different to mine, more so a sense of lifestyle shock, if there is such a thing. It was impossible to ignore. Inescapable, surrounding me like a misty haze on a dark night.

It was something I never got used too. The disparity did not plague me incessantly but sporadic pangs of guilt crept up when I would arrive in the village in the morning after having a scrumptious, rich and nutritious breakfast made by our chef at our home. After a while, I was numb to the difference, naively or ignorantly I faced the fact that life was just like that. I’m rich and they are poor and that’s why we were there to help. But somehow, and thankfully, it isn’t so black and white. As many others have mentioned on their blogs, they have so much more than monetary wealth and fancy meals, they have a true and joyous spirit and that matters so much more. So much more.

So when I came back to my real world, I made a conscious effort to not be frivolous with my money (not that I had much by our society’s standards) but still generous with what I have. The cost of meals perturbed me here as I silently and constantly say in my head how much that amount can feed in Peru. Now, four months later, I am still challenged by the difference of our lifestyles. I have learned to cope but feel so helpless sometimes. A few of my friends are ‘living below the line’ this week and I have seen how hard it is for them. Seeing my friend do it has challenged me to remember my little Peruvian kids and appreciate being here where I can eat what I want, when I want.

A meal for $2 a day in Sydney buys:

  • Tea bag
  • Half a cup of rice
  • An egg
  • Half a cup of oats

A meal for $2 a day in Quilla Huata buys:

  • ½ fried chicken
  • Half a plate of hot chips
  • A plate of rice
  • Salad and vegies

If we saw a meal like that here for $2, we would be rejoicing on mountain tops because that is a bargain! But that meal is an extreme luxury for most people in Quilla Huata. My biggest challenge taught me PERSPECTIVE.

One of the amazing things that Peru’s Challenge started this year was providing the kids with food at school to help with their concentration and health. Also Peru’s Challenge are aware that some of the kids have nothing to eat at home so by providing a solid meal at school, there is a greater chance of the kids actually attending school now.

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